WWII vehicles battle for bids at auction

On December 8th, Auctions America by RM is holding one of the largest ever sales  of WW II-era vehicles at the National Military History Center in Auburn,  Indiana. Over 80 vehicles, including the White M3A1 Armored Scout Car (above) will be  crossing the block, with all of the proceeds going toward preserving the  non-profit museum.

1943-44 Pacific M26 6×6 Armored “Dragon Wagon” Tank Recovery  Vehicle

Even tanks need to call in the cavalry now and then. The “Dragon Wagon” was  designed to haul disabled vehicles onboard weighing up to 45 tons, and with its  6×6 drivetrain get them out of harm’s way, even if that meant driving through  water four and a half feet deep.

Estimated price: $20,000-$40,000

Source: Darin Schnabel ©2012 Courtesy of RM  Auctions

1940 Humber Hexonaut GS 6×6 Amphibious Prototype

Literally one of a kind, the Humber Hexonaut is the only surviving version of  this prototype amphibious vehicle, with one engine and transmission on each side  it was steered like a tank and used the deep treads of its tires to propel it  through the water. It was designed to fit on board a C47 “Dakota” transport  plane, which explains its tall and narrow design.

Estimated price: $30,000-$50,000

1943-44 Opel Maultier Panzer-Werfer 42 Armored Half-Track Rocket  Launcher

This half-track rocket launcher was designed by a German Panzer division in  need of a vehicle that could cope with the muddy, unpaved terrain on the Eastern  front during the rainy season and spring thaw.

Estimated price: $45,00-$60,000

Source: Darin Schnabel ©2012 Courtesy of RM  Auctions

1944 Fiat-SPA TL37 4×4 Artillery Tractor

Riding on tiptoe-tall tires and fitted with four-wheel steering, this Italian  troop transporter was ideal for navigating the tight and twisty mountain roads  of Northern Italy. Believe it or not, even taller tires were fitted to deal with  the sandy terrain of Northern Africa.

Estimated price: $45,000-$55,000

Source: Darin Schnabel ©2012 Courtesy of RM  Auctions

 

1942-45 GMC DUKW – 353 6×6 Amphibious Truck

“The Duck” was one of the most abundand vehicles built during the war. Over  21,000 were made to transport troops and cargo to and from ships to land where  harbors weren’t available. Using a propeller, the amphibian could hit 6.3 mph on  the water. Many are used today as sightseeing vehicles in cities like New York  and Washington, D.C.

Estimated price: $50,000-$75,000

Source: Darin Schnabel ©2012 Courtesy of RM  Auctions

 

 

 

Advertisements

Boys Return War Medals to Medal of Honor Award Recipient’s Family

Boys Return War Medals to Medal of Honor Award Recipient’s Family

My .02: Hopefully the shop owner was not attempting to sell the medal to begin with in his shop as “It is illegal to sell, wear, or manufacture any decorations or medals authorized by Congress for the armed forces of the United States.”

For more facts about the Congressional Medal of Honor click here.

GEORGE, CHARLES

Rank: Private First Class

Organization: U.S. Army
Company: Company C
Division: 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division
Born: 23 August 1932, Cherokee, N.C.
Departed: Yes
Entered Service At: Whittier, N.C.
G.O. Number: 19
Date of Issue: 03/18/1954
Accredited To:
Place / Date: Near Songnae-dong, Korea, 30 November 1952
GEORGE, CHARLES Photo
Citation

Pfc. George, a member of Company C, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy on the night of 30 November 1952. He was a member of a raiding party committed to engage the enemy and capture a prisoner for interrogation. Forging up the rugged slope of the key terrain feature, the group was subjected to intense mortar and machine gun fire and suffered several casualties. Throughout the advance, he fought valiantly and, upon reaching the crest of the hill, leaped into the trenches and closed with the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. When friendly troops were ordered to move back upon completion of the assignment, he and 2 comrades remained to cover the withdrawal. While in the process of leaving the trenches a hostile soldier hurled a grenade into their midst. Pfc. George shouted a warning to 1 comrade, pushed the other soldier out of danger, and, with full knowledge of the consequences, unhesitatingly threw himself upon the grenade, absorbing the full blast of the explosion. Although seriously wounded in this display of valor, he refrained from any outcry which would divulge the position of his companions. The 2 soldiers evacuated him to the forward aid station and shortly thereafter he succumbed to his wound. Pfc. George’s indomitable courage, consummate devotion to duty, and willing self-sacrifice reflect the highest credit upon himself and uphold the finest traditions of the military service.

Raymond Weeks . . . pioneering efforts in the establishment of Veterans Day.

DID YOU KNOW?

Birmingham, Alabama, is home to the first and longest running celebration of Veterans Day?

Thanks to a man named Raymond Weeks.

The Origins of Veterans Day

In 1921, an unknown World War I American soldier was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. This site, on a hillside overlooking the Potomac River and the city of Washington, D.C., became the focal point of reverence for America’s veterans.

Similar ceremonies occurred earlier in England and France, where an unknown soldier was buried in each nation’s highest place of honor (in England, Westminster Abbey; in France, the Arc de Triomphe). These memorial gestures all took place on November 11, giving universal recognition to the celebrated ending of World War I fighting at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918 (the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month). The day became known as “Armistice Day.”

Armistice Day officially received its name in America in 1926 through a Congressional resolution. It became a national holiday 12 years later by similar Congressional action. If the idealistic hope had been realized that World War I was “the War to end all wars,” November 11 might still be called Armistice Day. But only a few years after the holiday was proclaimed, war broke out in Europe. Sixteen and one-half million Americans took part. Four hundred seven thousand of them died in service, more than 292,000 in battle.

1946 at The Pentagon: Raymond Weeks petitions
General Dwight Eisenhower to establish National Veterans Day.

Armistice Day Changed To Honor All Veterans

The first celebration using the term Veterans Day occurred in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1947. Raymond Weeks, a World War II veteran, organized “National Veterans Day,” which included a parade and other festivities, to honor all veterans. The event was held on November 11, then designated Armistice Day. Later, U.S. Representative Edward

Rees of Kansas proposed a bill that would change Armistice Day to Veterans Day. In 1954, Congress passed the bill that President Eisenhower signed proclaiming November 11 as Veterans Day. Raymond Weeks received the Presidential Citizens Medal from President Reagan in November 1982. Weeks’ local parade and ceremonies are now an annual event celebrated nationwide.

On Memorial Day 1958, two more unidentified American war dead were brought from overseas and interred in the plaza beside the unknown soldier of World War I. One was killed in World War II, the other in the Korean War. In 1984, an unknown serviceman from the Vietnam War was placed alongside the others. The remains from Vietnam were exhumed May 14, 1998, identified as Air Force 1st Lt. Michael Joseph Blassie, and removed for burial. To honor these men, symbolic of all Americans who gave their lives in all wars, an Army honor guard, the 3rd U.S. Infantry (The Old Guard), keeps day and night vigil.

A law passed in 1968 changed the national commemoration of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October. It soon became apparent, however, that November 11 was a date of historic significance to many Americans. Therefore, in 1978 Congress returned the observance to its traditional date.

National Ceremonies Held at Arlington National Cemetery

The focal point for official, national ceremonies for Veterans Day continues to be the memorial amphitheater built around the Tomb of the Unknowns. At 11 a.m. on November 11, a combined color guard representing all military services executes “Present Arms” at the tomb. The nation’s tribute to its war dead is symbolized by the laying of a presidential wreath. The bugler plays “taps.” The rest of the ceremony takes place in the amphitheater.

Veterans Day ceremonies at Arlington and elsewhere are coordinated by the President’s Veterans Day National Committee. Chaired by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, the committee represents national veterans organizations.

Governors of many states and U.S. territories appoint Veterans Day chairpersons who, in cooperation with the National Committee and the Department of Defense, arrange and promote local ceremonies.

Additional Information

Additional information on the history of Veterans Day, the Veterans Day National Committee, the national ceremony, a gallery of Veterans Day posters from 1978 to the present and a colorful and informative Veterans Day Teacher’s Resource Guide can be found on the Internet at

http://www.va.gov/vetsday/

[Congressional Bills 112th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]
[H. Con. Res. 138 Introduced in House (IH)]

112th CONGRESS
  2d Session
H. CON. RES. 138

 Recognizing Birmingham, Alabama, as the home to the first and longest 
                  running celebration of Veterans Day.

_______________________________________________________________________

                    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                           September 20, 2012

    Mr. Bachus (for himself and Ms. Sewell) submitted the following 
concurrent resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Veterans' 
  Affairs, and in addition to the Committee on Armed Services, for a 
 period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for 
consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the 
                          committee concerned

_______________________________________________________________________

                         CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

 Recognizing Birmingham, Alabama, as the home to the first and longest 
                  running celebration of Veterans Day.

Whereas November 11, 2012, is the 65th anniversary of National Veterans Day in 
        Birmingham, Alabama;
Whereas the National Veterans Day in Birmingham is the longest running 
        celebration of Veterans Day in the United States;
Whereas, on November 11, 1946, World War II veteran Raymond Weeks presented 
        General Eisenhower a program design proposing replacing Armistice Day 
        with a National Veterans Day 1947;
Whereas the very first Veterans Day celebration was held in Birmingham by the 
        National Veterans Day organization in 1947;
Whereas President Eisenhower signed into law on June 1, 1954 the Act proclaiming 
        November 11 as Veterans Day (Public Law 83-380);
Whereas, in 1954, the National Veterans Day volunteer organization, started by 
        Raymond Weeks, expanded to organize a multiday celebration including, a 
        Veterans Day Parade, a World Peace Luncheon, and presentation during the 
        National Veterans Award Dinner of the National Veterans Award;
Whereas these three events have been held every year since 1954;
Whereas the briefing for President Reagan by Elizabeth Dole for the Presidential 
        Citizens Medals cited Raymond Weeks as the ``Father of Veterans Day'';
Whereas President Reagan recognized Raymond Weeks as the driving force behind 
        Veterans Day while presenting Mr. Weeks with the Presidential Citizens 
        Medal on November 11, 1982;
Whereas Raymond Weeks should be recognized for his push to honor the great men 
        and women who have served their country with a special day of 
        recognition; and
Whereas Birmingham, Alabama, should be recognized for its contributions to the 
        institution of Veterans Day: Now, therefore, be it
    Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), 
That Congress hereby--
            (1) recognizes Birmingham, Alabama, as the home to the 
        first and longest running celebration of Veterans Day;
            (2) recognizes Raymond Weeks for his pioneering efforts in 
        the establishment of Veterans Day; and
            (3) honors the sacrifices and pays tribute to the men and 
        women in uniform who are risking life and limb at home and 
        overseas.
                                 <all>

Video – Carrier pigeon’s remains found in chimney with wartime coded message

Carrier pigeon’s remains found in chimney with wartime coded message

David Martin tells how he discovered the skeleton of a carrier pigeon carrying a coded message in his chimney of his home near Reigate, Surrey. Martin was renovating his fireplace when he came across the bird’s remains, with a red message-barrel still attached to its leg. War experts are now trying to decipher the message

  • Source: Reuters
  • Length: 50 sec
  • Friday 2 November 2012