Spring Break in Alabama. . .Cemeteries, Bass Fishing, and Camping

Spring Break in Alabama. . .Cemeteries, Bass Fishing, and Camping

Unlike most folks that are on spring break this week, we didn’t make our usual pilgrimage to the beach. This year we are staying just outside the small Alabama town of Eufaula. What is so special about Eufaula? It’s the “Bass Capital of the World” and we’re down here with our girls to try and catch “The Big One” but it has eluded us thus far. We went into town for lunch and saw residents and businesses putting the finishing touches on the antebellum homes along main street for the 2014 Eufaula Pilgrimage. On our way back to our campsite we drove through Fairview Cemetery. I love old, historic cemeteries and this one did not disappoint. . .

Fairvew contains a diverse collection of statuary, grave emblems  and monuments amid a picturesque park-like setting.  Many  monuments are attributed to the Tansey family who owned a  monument company in Eufaula and operated their marble yard  here. The arboretum in this area of the cemetery contains azaleas,  dogwoods, camellias, Japanese maple trees, and 1880s fountain,  and a collection of other ornamental plants and trees. Old  Fairview Cemetery is a reflection of Eufaula's significant history  and heritage.

Fairvew contains a diverse collection of statuary, grave emblems
and monuments amid a picturesque park-like setting. Many
monuments are attributed to the Tansey family who owned a
monument company in Eufaula and operated their marble yard
here. The arboretum in this area of the cemetery contains azaleas,
dogwoods, camellias, Japanese maple trees, and 1880s fountain,
and a collection of other ornamental plants and trees. Old
Fairview Cemetery is a reflection of Eufaula’s significant history
and heritage.

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Established in the 1830s, Fairview has approximately 1300 identified urials and is a memorial to some of Alabama’s most influential leaders. Inside its gates rest governors, lieutenant governors, state and federal elected officials, judges, university presidents, and industrialists. Over 350 identified Confederate soldiers and sailors, from general to private, are buried throughout the cemetery. A Confederate section of unknown soldiers is near the bluff side. Old Fairview is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Seth Lore & Irwinton Historic District and individually in the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register.

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Unidentified Confederate soldiers.

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Interred on this gently sloping hillside are the remains of many of Eufaula’s early black citizens. Their names are known only to God because the wooden grave markers which located the burials have long since vanished. This burying ground was used until about 1870 when black internments were moved to Pine Grove Cemetery. In addition to the “Old Negro Cemetery”, there are at least five other graveyards including the Jewish, Presbyterian, Masonic, Odd Fellows, and Public which are part of present day Fairview Cemetery.

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The earliest burials in this cemetery date from Eufaula’s pioneer days in the lae 1830’s and early 1840’s. Formerly known as the “Old Cemetery”, this public burial ground has been expanded through land purchases and the consolidation of other cemeteries including the Jewish, Presbyterian, Masonic, Odd Fellows, and Negro. At the suggestion of his daughter, Claude Hill, Mayor P.B. McKenzie named the cemetery “Fairview” about 1895. The iron fence which borders the property on North Randolph Avenue was salvaged from Union Female College.

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James M. Folsom Company A 1st Alabama Infantry CSA (Confederate States of America)

Local History: Historic Linwood Cemetery

Local History: Historic Linwood Cemetery

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More than 200 soldiers from every Confederate state are buried in two separate plots in Linwood Cemetery. Many of these men died in the several Confederate hospitals located in Columbus, 1862-1865. Numbers fell in the battle here, Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865, between less than 2,000 soldiers and citizens, hastily organized for the defense of Columbus, and 4,000 of Wilson’s Federal Raiders, dismounted for the attack. This was the last battle of the War Between the States east of the Mississippi River.
BRIGADIER GENERAL HENRY L. BENNING (1814-1875), called “The Old Rock” for his coolness and daring under fire, is buried here. He fought with great distinction through the Virginia Campaigns and finally commanded his own, Benning’s Brigade, known as “The Rock Brigade.” Fort Benning was named for him.
JOHN DUNLOP, native of England, member of the crew of the Confederate Ironclad “Virginia” (Merrimac) in the historic fight of the ironclads, May 8-9, 1862, is buried here.
Many other Confederate soldiers lie in private plots in Linwood Cemetery.

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This gun was one of the battery of the Confederate ram, built in Columbus, captured and burned by Wilson Raiders. April 16, 1865 – Mounted by Benning Camp

This past Monday, I was in downtown Columbus, Georgia and decided to stop in to visit the Historic Linwood Cemetery.  I’ve frequented the cemetery numerous times over the years but never stumbled upon the marker for Columbus’ First Jewish Cemetery (see below). A majority of the headstones were in Hebrew but a few were in English. Many of the headstones listed Russia as the birthplace. One of my online classes is currently studying Russian Jewish Immigration to the United States so I figured this photo opp. was pretty good timing. 🙂

Columbus' First Jewish Cemetery Since Biblical times when Abraham purchased land to bury his wife Sarah, it has been considered a religious obligation for Jews to set aside land for interring their dead. Often before congregations were established burial societies were formed to perform this sacred act. This site, established by Reform congregation Temple B'nai Israel, is the first burial ground in Columbus for members of the Jewish faith. The first burial was in 1852. Louis Haiman, famous Civil War arms maker for the Confederacy, is interred here as are ancestors of many prominent Columbus families. Jewish burial traditions continue today in the city's Riverdale Cemetery.

Columbus’ First Jewish Cemetery
Since Biblical times when Abraham purchased land to bury his wife Sarah, it has been considered a religious obligation for Jews to set aside land for interring their dead. Often before congregations were established burial societies were formed to perform this sacred act. This site, established by Reform congregation Temple B’nai Israel, is the first burial ground in Columbus for members of the Jewish faith. The first burial was in 1852. Louis Haiman, famous Civil War arms maker for the Confederacy, is interred here as are ancestors of many prominent Columbus families. Jewish burial traditions continue today in the city’s Riverdale Cemetery.