Local History: Historic Linwood Cemetery

Local History: Historic Linwood Cemetery

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More than 200 soldiers from every Confederate state are buried in two separate plots in Linwood Cemetery. Many of these men died in the several Confederate hospitals located in Columbus, 1862-1865. Numbers fell in the battle here, Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865, between less than 2,000 soldiers and citizens, hastily organized for the defense of Columbus, and 4,000 of Wilson’s Federal Raiders, dismounted for the attack. This was the last battle of the War Between the States east of the Mississippi River.
BRIGADIER GENERAL HENRY L. BENNING (1814-1875), called “The Old Rock” for his coolness and daring under fire, is buried here. He fought with great distinction through the Virginia Campaigns and finally commanded his own, Benning’s Brigade, known as “The Rock Brigade.” Fort Benning was named for him.
JOHN DUNLOP, native of England, member of the crew of the Confederate Ironclad “Virginia” (Merrimac) in the historic fight of the ironclads, May 8-9, 1862, is buried here.
Many other Confederate soldiers lie in private plots in Linwood Cemetery.

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This gun was one of the battery of the Confederate ram, built in Columbus, captured and burned by Wilson Raiders. April 16, 1865 – Mounted by Benning Camp

This past Monday, I was in downtown Columbus, Georgia and decided to stop in to visit the Historic Linwood Cemetery.  I’ve frequented the cemetery numerous times over the years but never stumbled upon the marker for Columbus’ First Jewish Cemetery (see below). A majority of the headstones were in Hebrew but a few were in English. Many of the headstones listed Russia as the birthplace. One of my online classes is currently studying Russian Jewish Immigration to the United States so I figured this photo opp. was pretty good timing. 🙂

Columbus' First Jewish Cemetery Since Biblical times when Abraham purchased land to bury his wife Sarah, it has been considered a religious obligation for Jews to set aside land for interring their dead. Often before congregations were established burial societies were formed to perform this sacred act. This site, established by Reform congregation Temple B'nai Israel, is the first burial ground in Columbus for members of the Jewish faith. The first burial was in 1852. Louis Haiman, famous Civil War arms maker for the Confederacy, is interred here as are ancestors of many prominent Columbus families. Jewish burial traditions continue today in the city's Riverdale Cemetery.

Columbus’ First Jewish Cemetery
Since Biblical times when Abraham purchased land to bury his wife Sarah, it has been considered a religious obligation for Jews to set aside land for interring their dead. Often before congregations were established burial societies were formed to perform this sacred act. This site, established by Reform congregation Temple B’nai Israel, is the first burial ground in Columbus for members of the Jewish faith. The first burial was in 1852. Louis Haiman, famous Civil War arms maker for the Confederacy, is interred here as are ancestors of many prominent Columbus families. Jewish burial traditions continue today in the city’s Riverdale Cemetery.

The 150th Anniversary of the H.L. Hunley

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The 150th Anniversary of the H.L. Hunley

This past Monday, February 17th, marked the 150th anniversary that the Confederate submarine, the H.L. Hunley, successfully attacked the USS Housatonic off the coast of South Carolina.

The Post and Courier’s columnist Brian Hicks puts readers right along the South Carolina coastline on the night of February 17, 1864 in his story, How the H.L. Hunley became the first submarine to sink an enemy ship.

The Hunley: Zeroing in on what caused Civil War submarine’s sinking from CNN.

LINKS:

Previous Hungry for History posts related to the H.L. Hunley

President’s Day in Plains, GA – 2014

TOP: Our view of President and Mrs. Carter from the back row of the Plains High School auditorium.   BOTTOM LEFT: Girls sitting at a replica of President Carter's desk from the White House. BOTTOM RIGHT: Our National Park Service date stamps from our 2013 and 2014 visits.

TOP: Our view of President and Mrs. Carter from the back row of the Plains High School auditorium.
BOTTOM LEFT: Girls sitting at a replica of President Carter’s desk from the White House.
BOTTOM RIGHT: Our National Park Service date stamps from our 2013 and 2014 visits.

President’s Day in Plains, GA – 2014

Last year we took a one-hour country drive down to Plains, GA to learn about Teddy Roosevelt. This year we were drawn back to the tiny peanut farming town, southeast of Columbus, GA to hear President Carter and Mrs. Rosalynn Carter talk about their time in the White House. The Jimmy Carter National Historic Site, part of the National Parks Service, hosted the event.

Mrs. Carter took the reigns and spoke first. She shared how hard it was to adjust to having the U.S. Secret Service personnel around all the time and told of how their daughter Amy wanted to invite John Travolta to the White House for her 11th birthday in 1977 and so they did. They served up spaghetti on that special day. President Carter reflected on his accomplishments and how he came from humble beginnings in the neighboring town of Archery, GA. He made it into the U.S. Naval Academy, served as an  officer in the U.S. Navy, Governor of Georgia, and was then elected as the 39th president of the United States. He shared intimate details of the 13 day Camp David Accords and his time with Egyptian President Anwar El Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin. President and Mrs. Carter spoke for almost an hour, responded to questions, and then autographed books.

My daughters (8 & 10) found it interesting to see President Carter in person and understood the fact that he’s one of only 4 living former presidents. I enjoyed the fact that this is one of many events where President and Mrs. Carter give back to their hometown and for one-hour we were able to see them speak casually about such an important time in their lives.

LINKS:

Shirley Temple-Black – more than just a child star

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Shirley Temple Black – more than just a child star

Shirley Temple Black passed away Monday, February 10th at the age of 85. Most people remember her as the little girl in the black and white movies from the 1930s, but she was more than just an adorable face on the silver screen. She gave people in the Depression-era an image of hope and inspiration when they watched her movies. She crossed color-barriers by dancing hand-in-hand with Bill Bojangles Robinson, a black actor and dancer. A small white girl and an adult black male singing and dancing together clearly ruffled the feathers of people across America, especially in the deep South. Her personality and screen presence drew moviegoers to the theaters and kept Fox from going into bankruptcy. She retired from film at the age of 21 and later turned to the global political stage. She was appointed as delegate to the United Nations in the 1960s by President Nixon and later served as U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Ghana and Czechoslovakia.

-s.l.

NPR presented two detailed reports on her life after her passing this week. You can listen to the shows or read the transcripts here:

Shirley Temple Black Dies At 85

One of the most famous childhood stars of all times, Shirley Temple Black has died. Remembered for her curls and acting talent, she became the face of hope during the Great Depression.

Shirley Temple Black, From Child Star To Diplomat

In the wake of her passing, remembrances of Shirley Temple Black have often focused on her fame as a child star, but she also long served as an ambassador — to both Ghana and Czechoslovakia. To find out more about Black’s diplomatic service, Melissa Block speaks with Charles Gati, the State Department consultant who prepared Black for her post in Czechoslovakia.

Olympics History: Olympic Park Lost in Time

150px-1984_Winter_Olympics_logo.svgOlympic Park Lost in Time

“February 10, 2014 – In 1984, the world turned to Sarajevo, Yugoslavia for the 14th Winter Olympic games. In 1992 all eyes, again, turned to Sarajevo, but this time it was because of the Bosnian War.”

This story from the Weather Channel shows the state of the 1984 host park today, 30 years later.