F R E E Live Stream “Temperance and Woman Suffrage: Reform Movements and the Women Who Changed America”

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Women’s History Month 2015

F R E E Live Stream “Temperance and Woman Suffrage: Reform Movements and the Women Who Changed America”

There’s only 1 day left in March which means that Women’s History Month is coming to an end. Go out with a bang with the U.S. National Archives and the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum in Washington D.C. as they live stream “Temperance & Woman Suffrage” on 3/31/15 @ 7pm ET

YouTube Live Stream link: 

Temperance and Woman Suffrage: Reform Movements and the Women Who Changed America
The temperance and woman suffrage movements of the late 19th and early 20th centuries created opportunities for women to organize for social, economic, and political change. Support for the temperance movement through the largest women’s organization, the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, opened the door for women to work not only for temperance, but for issues including improved working conditions for wage-earning women, improved public education, and political equality. Page Harrington, executive director of the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum, leads a discussion on how these reform movements provide a fascinating study of the individuals who participated in both movements, the organizations they created, and women as the driving force behind significant change in the United States. Lori Osborne, archivist and president of the Frances Willard Historical Association; Dr. Rosalyn Terborg-Penn, University Professor Emerita, Morgan State University; and Kristina Myers, program director at the Alice Paul Institute, will also participate. Presented in partnership with the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum in celebration of Women’s History Month.

March = National Women’s History Month

women'shistorymonth

March = National Women’s History Month

Here are some great sites to get you started. . .

Mount Vernon Virtual Tour

MtVernon

Can’t make it to Mount Vernon, VA? No problem!

Mount Vernon Virtual Tour

My daughter’s 3rd grade class has been studying George Washington and I remembered that the Mount Vernon website had some great resources available and shared the site with her teacher. They have expanded their online virtual tour of George and Martha Washington’s home which is a wonderful tool if you’re unable to get to Mount Vernon, Virginia. The virtual tour includes the mansion, outbuildings, gardens and landscapes, distillery and gristmill, and the library. Enjoy!

Mount Vernon Virtual Tour

Superheroes with Stan Lee + history = free course

‘The Rise of Superheroes and Their Impact On Pop Culture’ is a free course offered by the Smithsonian and edX.

Click here to learn more and register.

During the course you’ll explore the following questions:

  • Why did superheroes first arise in 1938 and experience what we refer to as their “Golden Age” during World War II?
  • Why did the superhero genre ebb and flow in popularity over the decades?
  • How have comic books, published weekly since the mid-1930’s, mirrored a changing American society, reflecting our mores, slang, fads, biases and prejudices?
  • Why was the comic book industry nearly shut down in the McCarthy Era of the 1950’s?
  • How did our superheroes become super-villains in the eyes of the government, clergy, educators, and parents of the mid-20th Century?
  • When and how did comic books become acceptable again, and eventually become valid teaching tools in universities and schools?
  • When and how did comic book artwork become accepted as a true American art form as indigenous to this country as jazz?
  • Finally, when and how did comic books become “cool” and the basis for blockbuster movies, hit TV series, top-selling video games, and acclaimed animation, while also impacting fashion and style- and even the moral and ethical codes of children- around the globe?
School: SmithsonianX
Course Code: POPX1.1x
Classes Start: 5 May 2015
Course Length: 5 weeks
Estimated effort: 1 – 2 hours/week

Petroglyph National Monument marred by vandalism, trash

Ike Eastvold, sitting in a graffiti-marred cave near the head of Boca Negra Arroyo at the Petroglyph National Monument, holds his hands to his ears to better hear the wind and the wildlife on the monument grounds. Eastvold, a longtime supporter of the monument on the Albuquerque's West Side, discovered the graffiti, litter and downed fencing while walking last week. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)

Ike Eastvold, sitting in a graffiti-marred cave near the head of Boca Negra Arroyo at the Petroglyph National Monument, holds his hands to his ears to better hear the wind and the wildlife on the monument grounds. Eastvold, a longtime supporter of the monument on the Albuquerque’s West Side, discovered the graffiti, litter and downed fencing while walking last week. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)

Petroglyph National Monument marred by vandalism, trash

Mystery footage found of 1915 Chicago River disaster

(AP Photo/File)

(AP Photo/File)

Mystery footage found of 1915 Chicago River disaster

“A US doctoral candidate found the footage, which is housed at a Netherlands film institute, while doing online research for his dissertation on Chicago during the First World War.

The clips were spliced between footage of marching soldiers and ceremonies, and it’s not clear how it got there. “That’s part of the intrigue, part of the mystery behind even having this footage available,” says Wachholz.”


 

Jewish soldier’s WWII letter, written on Hitler’s stationary, sent to museum

© Charles Trainor Jr./Miami Herald/TNS Danny Jacobson holds a photo copy of a letter written on Adolf Hitler's stationary with a photo of himself in uniform in World War II. He found the stationery in an abandoned apartment in Munich.

© Charles Trainor Jr./Miami Herald/TNS
Danny Jacobson holds a photo copy of a letter written on Adolf Hitler’s stationary with a photo of himself in uniform in World War II. He found the stationery in an abandoned apartment in Munich.

Jewish soldier’s WWII letter, written on Hitler’s stationary, sent to museum

Visit: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum